Reviews that mention Tetuzi Akiyama

August 7, 2020

Akiyama/Field/Vidic

Interpersonal Subjectivities
Astral Spirits MF218/AS 117

Stephen Gauci/Ava Mendoza/Vijay Anderson

Studio Sessions Vol. 4

Gauci Music No #

Replacing the double bass with a guitar in a free improving trio with saxophone and drums opens up new possibilities since the six-string can function as rhythm or front-line instrument. However as these sessions reveal thinking musicians can twist this trio combination into any shape.

As raw and visceral as its blunt title, the Brooklyn-based Studio Sessions Vol. 4 pits the unabashed and corybantic tenor saxophone techniques of Stephen Gauci, who has worked with everyone from Adam Lane to Cooper Moore with the distorted frailings of guitarist Ava Mendoza, leader of the Unnatural Ways band, who has played with the likes of ROVA. Backing with bombast is drummer Vijay Anderson, an associate of Vinny Golia and Lisa Mezzacappa, Dedicated to a more organic approach is the trio on Interpersonal Subjectivities’ three selections. Japanese guitarist Tetuzi Akiyama has worked with Keiji Haino and Taku Sugimoto. British percussionist Nicolas Field has played with Jacques Demierre and Akira Sakata; while Geneva-based tenor saxophonist Vidic Gregor is associated with George Hadow and Albert Cirera. MORE

September 19, 2013

Satanic Abandoned Rock’n’Roll Society

Bloody Imagination
Mikroton cd 12

Cremaster & Angharad Davies

Pluie Fine

Potlatch P312

Dealing with varieties of sound arising from electronic interface poses aural challenges, especially when traditional instruments are also part of the mix. Brushing aside the need for familiar textures from, say, the violin and guitars used on these two discs, one can still appreciate the extended techniques finessed to blend with – or against – the massed electronics. Yet when the multiplied processing reaches its zenith – as it does several times on both CD – the welcome disintegration of the opaque sound mass may appear to be musical development. MORE

March 23, 2010

Tetuzi Akiyama/Éden Carrasco/Leonel Kaplan

Moments of Falling Petals
Dromos Records 001

Mary Halvorson/Reuben Radding/Nate Wooley

Crackleknob

hatOLOGY 662

Hautzinger/Okura/Akiyama

Rebuses

MonotypeRec. mono027

Combined, contrasted and contrapuntal guitar and trumpet textures – plus those of another instrument – are what tie together these notable sessions. Yet even though only a trio of instruments is involved on each – and Tokyo-based On-kyo guitarist Tetuzi Akiyama is present on two of the three CDs – the overall performances can readily be distinguished from one another. MORE

March 23, 2010

Hautzinger/Okura/Akiyama

Rebuses
MonotypeRec. mono027

Mary Halvorson/Reuben Radding/Nate Wooley

Crackleknob

hatOLOGY 662

Tetuzi Akiyama/Éden Carrasco/Leonel Kaplan

Moments of Falling Petals

Dromos Records 001

Combined, contrasted and contrapuntal guitar and trumpet textures – plus those of another instrument – are what tie together these notable sessions. Yet even though only a trio of instruments is involved on each – and Tokyo-based On-kyo guitarist Tetuzi Akiyama is present on two of the three CDs – the overall performances can readily be distinguished from one another. MORE

March 17, 2003

ASSUMED POSSIBILITIES

Still point
Rossbin RS 007

AKIYAMA/NAKAMURA/SUGIMOTO/WASTELL
Foldings
Confront 12

Silence and the overtones associated with near silence are the guiding factors of these CDs, which both include British cellist Mark Wastell. With textural space on show and protracted electro-acoustic wheezes characterizing many of the abstractions here, neither of the two chamber-style quartets could be confused with conventional jazz, rock or New music ensembles. Neither sounds like the other either. All of which proves that there are as many variations of near silence as there are types of noise. MORE

February 10, 2003

OKURA/KAWASAKI/AKIYAMA

Bject
Hibari Music 02

CHAINWORKS
Red Room
Sachimay sca 9358

Novelty instruments have been around as long as the existence of improvised music. Red McKenzie was able to produce some memorable sounds from comb and tissue paper in the 1920s, around the time Adrian Rollini was taking solos on the goofus and the hot fountain pen. Yusef Lateef recorded an LP featuring a percussion section of balloons and 7-Up bottles in the 1950s, while Steve Beresford’s collection of toys and Eugene Chadbourne’s electric rake have been showcased more recently. MORE